4 Things You Didn’t Know You Can Recycle

Recycle

If you try to find ways to help the earth and to do your part to protect future generations, then you likely already recycle. Now, you probably already know about common items like recycling glass, cardboard, and plastic. However, did you know that there are so many more things out there that you can recycle? You may just be surprised by some of them.

1. Computers

Do you have old, broken computers lying around your garage because you aren’t sure what to do with them? Luckily, most cities have a computer recycling program. A computer is made up of many different parts, and a lot of them can be saved and reused for other things, including building other computers.

2. Eyeglasses

If you have eyeglasses, you know that they can break very easily. Now, instead of tossing them into the trash, find a local drop-off for recycling the glasses. Everything from your glasses can be repurposed, from the lenses all the way to the nose protectors. Talk to your local optometrist to find your nearest recycling drop-off.

3. Clothing

I’m sure that you already donate your unwanted clothes to a thrift store, but did you know that you can recycle the worn-out clothing that you used to throw away? Clothing is made into scraps, rags and fibrous materials. Scraps and rags can be made into things like rugs or compressed for use in mattresses, while fibrous material can be used to make paper or filling material for car insulation or furniture padding.

4. Motor Oil

Motor oil is so bad for the environment that 38 states have banned it from being put into a landfill. Instead of tossing it, find a local company that will recycle it. Often, automotive companies that sell oil will accept it for recycling. The oil can be cleaned and repurposed as motor oil or additives can be mixed in, and it can be used as fuel.…

How To Excel in Industrial Manufacturing

Industrial Manufacturing

Industrial manufacturing is an important industry because it’s responsible for the vast majority of commercial products available today. This makes manufacturing not only a crucial industry from the consumer’s perspective, but also the bedrock of the supply chain for every business out there. Manufacturers have the benefit of a perpetual and universal demand for these reasons, but they also face a number of unique challenges. Here’s what you need to know.

Equipment

Industrial manufacturing is characterized by the use of industrial-grade machinery to automate and otherwise streamline production methods beyond what human hands are capable of. This distinction presents manufacturers with a couple of problems that need to be solved. First and foremost, procuring this equipment can be incredibly costly. While it’s easily worth the cost in the long run, it will necessitate a hefty initial investment, and this means that expanding the scope of your business too quickly can easily be your downfall. It’s also important to know what to look for and where. For example, you may need a combustion engine Royal Oak MD to power your machines, and the types of machines you need can vary wildly depending on what your company produces.

Safety

One thing you can always count on with industrial machinery is a certain degree of danger. As such, safety is a major priority of manufacturers. Not only is it important to protect your workers from harm when and where it’s possible to do so, but it’s also a matter of legal liability. There are many industry and federal regulations that can guide your hand when trying to establish a safe workspace for your staff, and failing to adhere to these regulations can result in injuries or casualties, not to mention large fees, lawsuits, and possible jail time. Staying within the letter of the law is important for your business on multiple fronts, so be absolutely sure your workspace passes inspection.…

Knife Throwing: A New Old Sport

Knife Throwing

When you hear “knife throwing”, what comes to mind? If you picture a carnival act staged by sinister performers, you should think again. Thanks to exposure on the internet and, more recently, reality television, this once obscure hobby is gaining new traction as a competitive activity.

A Bit of Background

The practice of knife throwing dates back to the hunting methods of our primitive ancestors. Throughout history, cultures across the world have thrown knives in combat and for competition. Knife throwing as entertainment attained popularity in the 1800s as a circus trick. Today, knife throwing associations are turning this ancient art into a regulated sport, complete with scoring and rankings of participants.

The Importance of the Knife

Not any ordinary knife can be thrown. Made from stainless steels Houston TX, typically a single piece of metal, specialized knives are weighted and designed for throwing. Throwing knives have a blade and a grip, but often no handle, and are either balanced or unbalanced. Balanced knives have an even center of gravity so they spin in a circle. Unbalanced knives fly more wildly and are used by more skilled practitioners. Some pieces can be calibrated to switch between balanced and unbalanced. Lighter knives are easier to throw, but heavier knives are more likely to stick in the target.

Perfecting Your Technique

Competitive knife throwing is both a science and an art. As in archery, knives are thrown straight at a target from increasing distances, with points based on where they land relative to the bull’s-eye. Changes in grip, posture, throwing movement and distance all dictate the knife’s speed and trajectory.

Most throwers use a spin technique, where the knife rotates in mid-air. The thrower must guess the number of rotations the knife needs to make, and either hold it by the grip for full spins or the blade for half-spins. No-spin techniques send the knife in a straight line for a slower but less stable throw.

Many professional knife throwers began as backyard hobbyists. With a proper knife, a solid target and enough open space, you too can master this venerable tradition.…

What Skills Do You Need for a Career in Custom Machining?

Custom Machining

Although people who run machining equipment don’t need a college degree, some training is helpful and employers prefer it. Here are some skills you will need if you want to become a CNC operator.

CNC machines are extremely complex, computer-driven pieces of equipment. The work requires precision, and not everyone has what it takes to become a CNC machinist. Required skills for this career path include:

  • Math: CNC stands for Computer Numerically Control, so math is a big part of the custom machining job. This is a good fit for people who love numbers and like learning to program machines.
  • Communication: CNC operators often need to write technical notes and they usually are part of a team, so the ability to communicate technical information successfully is a must.
  • Creative Problem-Solving: If you love digging into a program to find out why it didn’t work, this career is a good fit for you. Machinists spend a lot of time fine-tuning equipment, and the ability to think on your feet and not be easily discouraged is a plus.
  • Accuracy and Attention to Detail: These machines work to the level of thousandths of an inch, and accuracy is extremely important. You need to be able to pay attention to minute details in this field.
  • Managing Your Time: There are many steps to custom machining and developing a sense of how long it takes you to accomplish each one is important for developing and maintaining a production schedule.
  • Soft Skills: Other skills include an attitude of safety, a good work ethic and assertiveness. When  you work around large machines, it is important to follow safety rules and make sure the equipment is running properly. You need to show up and do your job because you are part of a team. Finally, it helps to be able to express your opinion. Sometimes you will find a mistake, and it will mean stopping production and making people do things over again. That sometimes makes people angry, but it is part of the job of a CNC machinist.

If this sounds like you, custom machining may be the right career for you.…

Using Fertilizer Can Make Your Plants Healthier

Healthy plants need water, sunshine and good soil. The soil provides nitrogen and other nutrients essential to plant growth. Sometimes they need a little extra help. This is where fertilizer comes in handy. Whether you have a field of several acres or just a small backyard garden, fertilizer can boost the growth and health of your flowers and vegetables.

Commercial Fertilizers

There are many companies that manufacture quality fertilizer. The ingredients are put into a large, tilted drum and mixed, generally using a ribbon blender. This type of blade allows aeration of the fertilizer. Nitrogen-based fertilizers are made using either ammonia or nitric acid. These compounds can be combined to form ammonium nitrate which provides nutrition to help your plants grow. Other fertilizers contain potassium or phosphorous. Depending on what you are growing, one of these fertilizers may be better suited to your needs.

Make Your Own Fertilizer

You can also use other substances. Manure, especially horse and cow, makes an excellent fertilizer. Farmers usually have plenty of it laying around. You can get some at a horse or dairy farm. Many farmers will sell you their surplus at an affordable price or may let you just take some. You could also use the trick that Native Americans developed centuries ago. Fish and their leftover parts after cleaning can be buried where you plant. This has been proven to supply plants with nutrition and help them grow and stay healthy and beautiful.

Gardening is a wonderful hobby that can be relaxing and put food on your table. Growing healthy plants requires that you give them the attention they need. Water them regularly, make sure they get enough sun, and don’t forget the fertilizers. Whether you buy it or make your own, it will provide your plants with the nutrition they need to grow to their healthiest.…